Category: Github

Github

Setting up Travis CI in Android

Setting up Travis CI in Android

If you are developing using TDD you should run your tests to be sure that you don’t break something in every TDD phase. But we are not perfect and we can commit changes that break our system and we should have something that can alert us if we are doing something wrong asap. This is going to be a short guide on getting set and ready with Travis CI in Android. Before we continue, you need to have an Android Studio project already set up. Now let’s get down to business.

Prerequisites

  • Create a github repo for your project
  • Head over to the root of your project and create a .travis.yml (More on this later)
  • Still at the root of your project, create a folder/directory called licenses; this directory will help in exporting your license agreements such as sdk license agreement from your local machine to the build environment.
  • Now head over to your sdk location and locate a folder/directory called licenses, copy its contents then go ahead and paste them inside the licenses folder/directory you created previously at your project root.
  • You’re now set up, just do a git init, add all your files to git then push your code to Github.

Setting up Travis CI

Here is where Continous Integration comes into play. Every time that you push changes into a branch in your system you can check if everything is ok before you merge this branch into Master (assuming you are using git). What to check? Well, this is up to you and your team members to decide.

I keep my promises! , lets now talk about .travis.yml mentioned earlier. So this is just a file that tells your build machine how it should be configured and also provides the necessary tools and information to get your build system up and running.

So how does this file look like? Here’s the code, you can copy paste it but ensure you go through it to have a grasp of what’s going on.

You can decide to paste it directly to your code then commit and push the changes or paste it in your Github Repo then pull the changes, either of these two will work fine.

Travis provides the service for free but your repo in Github must be public and the free URL is different from the premium URL.

After visiting Travis, sign in with Github. Search for your Github repo then add it. Travis will go to your repo, locate the .travis.yml file and do the rest. Hopefully, if you followed every step correctly, your build should be successful and the repo should turn green with the badge at the top indicating build passing.

Bonus

It’s awesome looking at that badge from your repo. So to add it to your repo, go ahead and click on it. A pop up will show with the url of the badge. Copy the url then paste it in your README file. Here’s an example of how the file should look like inside your README file.

Hooray! Your CI should now be up and running. Thanks for your time.

Happy Coding!

Introduction to Github

Introduction to Github

Hi and welcome to our fourth tutorial in this series. Today i will be teaching you guys how to use Github, as I will be posting all the codes that we will be working on there. This will help you follow up easily and do some practicals later on your own. Lets get started with Github!

You’ll learn how to:

  • Create and use a repository
  • Start and manage a new branch
  • Make changes to a file and push them to GitHub as commits
  • Open and merge a pull request

What is GitHub?

GitHub is a code hosting platform for version control and collaboration. It lets you and others work together on projects from anywhere.

This tutorial teaches you GitHub essentials like repositories, branches, commits, and Pull Requests. You’ll create your own Hello World repository and learn GitHub’s Pull Request workflow, a popular way to create and review code.

No coding necessary

To complete this tutorial, you need a GitHub.com account and Internet access. You don’t need to know how to code, use the command line, or install Git (the version control software GitHub is built on). First, we need to install Git (Windows Users), Linux and Mac OS users can do git operations on the Terminal.

Tip: Open this guide in a separate browser window (or tab) so you can see it while you complete the steps in the tutorial.

Install Git on Windows

Git for Windows stand-alone installer

  1. Download the latest Git for Windows installer.
  2. When you’ve successfully started the installer, you should see the Git Setup wizard screen. Follow the Next and Finish prompts to complete the installation. The default options are pretty sensible for most users.
  3. Open a Command Prompt (or Git Bash if during installation you elected not to use Git from the Windows Command Prompt).
  4. Run the following commands to configure your Git username and email using the following commands, replacing Emma’s name with your own. These details will be associated with any commits that you create:

Git will be useful in performing the git operations from the Command Line in Windows machines.

Step 1. Create a Repository

A repository is usually used to organize a single project. Repositories can contain folders and files, images, videos, spreadsheets, and data sets – anything your project needs. We recommend including a README, or a file with information about your project. GitHub makes it easy to add one at the same time you create your new repository. It also offers other common options such as a license file.

Your hello-world repository can be a place where you store ideas, resources, or even share and discuss things with others.

To create a new repository

  1. In the upper right corner, next to your avatar or identicon, click and then select New repository.
  2. Name your repository hello-world.
  3. Write a short description.
  4. Select Initialize this repository with a README.

new-repo-form

Click Create repository. :tada:

Step 2. Create a Branch

Branching is the way to work on different versions of a repository at one time.

By default your repository has one branch named master which is considered to be the definitive branch. We use branches to experiment and make edits before committing them to master.

When you create a branch off the master branch, you’re making a copy, or snapshot, of master as it was at that point in time. If someone else made changes to the master branch while you were working on your branch, you could pull in those updates.

This diagram shows:

  • The master branch
  • A new branch called feature (because we’re doing ‘feature work’ on this branch)
  • The journey that feature takes before it’s merged into master

a branch

Have you ever saved different versions of a file? Something like:

  • story.txt
  • story-joe-edit.txt
  • story-joe-edit-reviewed.txt

Branches accomplish similar goals in GitHub repositories.

Here at GitHub, our developers, writers, and designers use branches for keeping bug fixes and feature work separate from our master (production) branch. When a change is ready, they merge their branch into master.

To create a new branch

  1. Go to your new repository hello-world.
  2. Click the drop down at the top of the file list that says branch: master.
  3. Type a branch name, readme-edits, into the new branch text box.
  4. Select the blue Create branch box or hit “Enter” on your keyboard.

branch gif

Now you have two branches, master and readme-edits. They look exactly the same, but not for long! Next we’ll add our changes to the new branch.

Step 3. Make and commit changes

Bravo! Now, you’re on the code view for your readme-edits branch, which is a copy of master. Let’s make some edits.

On GitHub, saved changes are called commits. Each commit has an associated commit message, which is a description explaining why a particular change was made. Commit messages capture the history of your changes, so other contributors can understand what you’ve done and why.

Make and commit changes

  1. Click the README.md file.
  2. Click the pencil icon in the upper right corner of the file view to edit.
  3. In the editor, write a bit about yourself.
  4. Write a commit message that describes your changes.
  5. Click Commit changes button.

commit

These changes will be made to just the README file on your readme-editsbranch, so now this branch contains content that’s different from master.

Step 4. Open a Pull Request

Nice edits! Now that you have changes in a branch off of master, you can open a pull request.

Pull Requests are the heart of collaboration on GitHub. When you open a pull request, you’re proposing your changes and requesting that someone review and pull in your contribution and merge them into their branch. Pull requests show diffs, or differences, of the content from both branches. The changes, additions, and subtractions are shown in green and red.

As soon as you make a commit, you can open a pull request and start a discussion, even before the code is finished.

By using GitHub’s @mention system in your pull request message, you can ask for feedback from specific people or teams, whether they’re down the hall or 10 time zones away.

You can even open pull requests in your own repository and merge them yourself. It’s a great way to learn the GitHub Flow before working on larger projects.

Open a Pull Request for changes to the README

Click on the image for a larger version

Step Screenshot
Click the Pull Request tab, then from the Pull Request page, click the green New pull request button. pr-tab
Select the branch you made, readme-edits, to compare with master (the original). branch
Look over your changes in the diffs on the Compare page, make sure they’re what you want to submit. diff
When you’re satisfied that these are the changes you want to submit, click the big green Create Pull Request button. create-pull
Give your pull request a title and write a brief description of your changes. pr-form

When you’re done with your message, click Create pull request!


Tip: You can use emoji and drag and drop images and gifs onto comments and Pull Requests.

Step 5. Merge your Pull Request

In this final step, it’s time to bring your changes together – merging your readme-edits branch into the master branch.

  1. Click the green Merge pull request button to merge the changes into master.
  2. Click Confirm merge.
  3. Go ahead and delete the branch, since its changes have been incorporated, with the Delete branch button in the purple box.

mergedelete

Celebrate!

By completing this tutorial, you’ve learned to create a project and make a pull request on GitHub! :tada: :octocat: :zap:

Here’s what you accomplished in this tutorial:

  • Created an open source repository
  • Started and managed a new branch
  • Changed a file and committed those changes to GitHub
  • Opened and merged a Pull Request

Take a look at your GitHub profile and you’ll see your new contribution squares!

Cloning a repository

When you create a repository on GitHub, it exists as a remote repository. You can clone your repository to create a local copy on your computer and sync between the two locations.

This procedure assumes you have already created a repository on GitHub, or have an existing repository owned by someone else you’d like to contribute to.

  1. On GitHub, navigate to the main page of the repository.
  2. Clone or download buttonUnder your repository name, click Clone or download.
  3. Clone URL buttonIn the Clone with HTTPs section, click to copy the clone URL for the repository.
  4. Open Git Bash (Windows Users) and Terminal in Linux and Mac OS.
  5. Change the current working directory to the location where you want the cloned directory to be made.
  6. Type git clone, and then paste the URL you copied in Step 2.
  7. Press Enter. Your local clone will be created.

Git clone allows you to pull someones code to your local machine, all the code that we will be working on during this tutorial sessions will be available to all. Feel free to clone anytime and also get in touch if you need help or get stuck along the way.